MITACoach Mid-Summer Workshop Starting July 14

JOIN THE SUMMER 2014 COHORT

Mid-Summer Workshop Week of July 14

• Are you feeling overwhelmed?
• Do you feel the summer slipping away and you’re not writing?
• Would you like to be able to relax during family time and feel focused while you’re working?
• Want to prepare yourself and your family for the upcoming academic year?

Would you like to be part of a small cohort dedicated to finding solutions to these issues? 

Mothers working in the academy often find themselves torn in multiple directions with competing claims from family, teaching, research, service, and self-care. This workshop, run by Jocelyn Stitt, an academic mother devoted to helping other academic mothers, provides tested frameworks for rejuvenating, reflecting, and transforming the way we think about work by mother scholars at a variety of institutional locations.

Jocelyn’s coaching practice, MITACoach, is currently having a special of 3 coaching sessions with goal assessment toolkit and enrollment in the workshop for $199. OR, try out the coaching service by enrolling in the workshop for $69.

and receiving a free 30 minute session with Jocelyn. MITACoach is a coaching practice and blog dedicated to helping academics who are mothers find coaching, community, and support for their professional and personal goals. The summer cohort will be limited to 20 participants. EACH PARTICIPANT RECEIVES:

30 minute flash strategy call with MITACoach Jocelyn Stitt

Summer 2014 MITACoach workbook including

Concrete tips for using the summer to rejuvenate after a long academic year

10 key questions to help you reflect on your past work and family experiences

Writing prompts to identify and evaluate what your goals are for a successful blend of family and work

Curated transformative short readings that have the power to change how you think about work and parenting

Action Steps to help you reprioritize for the coming academic year

Four Conference Call Seminars over the course of the workshop addressing specific challenges facing academic mothers. Our fabulous SEMINAR LEADERS were chosen for their different institutional locations, their areas of expertise in education and mothering, their diverse identities and family structures, and their ability to overcome specific challenges. Each seminar will be recorded and available as an mp3 file for participants.

Email Jocelyn at mitacoach @ gmail.com with any questions. To sign up, please click on the Paypal Donate button on the right sidebar.

Seminar Leader Bios:

MICHELE DUNNUM lives in Ann Arbor and is a Professor of English and Coordinator of the Developmental Writing Program at Mott Community College in Flint.  Ten years ago, I began my tenure-track job four months before my divorce was final and had to adjust to the demands of full-time work and a one-hour commute as I navigated the emotional difficulties of sharing custody of my preschooler.  My son is now fourteen, beginning high school in the Fall, and I have been married to another Mott English professor for two years.  My husband brought two young-adult stepsons into my life, so I have learned a few things about the peculiar role of the stepmother and the art of family blending (gently—more like stirring than blending).  I could say that parenting, marriage, teaching a 4-4 load, and holding a leadership position at my college is a juggling act, but I lack the gross mental motor skills that are necessary for that kind of juggling.  I become an anxious insomniac if I try.  Instead, I pick up one ball at a time.  And I knit—as of four months ago, for the first time in a thousand years, I have an actual hobby(!)

LAURA HARRISON is an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at Minnesota State University – Mankato. I research the ways in which reproductive technologies intersect with ideologies of race, family formation, and reproductive justice. My current book project is titled Brown Bodies, White Babies: The Politics of Crossracial Gestational Surrogacy (under contract with NYU Press). I have a two and a half year old daughter named Ada and am due with my second child in August. I was on the job market while I was pregnant, finished my dissertation and accepted a job offer while my daughter was a newborn, and am facing book manuscript deadlines and pre-tenure job expectations while pregnant again! I look forward to discussing strategies and tactics that have worked for me in facing these challenges as a mother and an academic.

ALISON PIEPMEIRis director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and associate professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the College of Charleston (SC). I’ve written books including Girl Zines: Making Media, Doing Feminism (NYU Press, 2009), and I’m currently at work on another book, The Good Mother:  Down Syndrome and Reproductive Decision-Making (under contract with NYU Press).  I’m mother to Maybelle, who’s almost six and has Down syndrome. Since 2013 I’ve been a single parent. This means, among other things, that I’m trying to figure out how my budget can work. I have seizures and for the past three years have been unable to drive, although that recently changed [hurray!].

JOCELYN STITT I’ve spent the last year taking a leave from my academic position, moving to a new state, enrolling my kids school, joining a research institute at the University of Michigan, and starting MITACoach. When I’m not transporting kids and pets across state lines, I’m an Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Minnesota State University where my research focuses on the amazing cultural productions of Caribbean women, especially their autobiographies. I’ve taken my research on how women tell stories of resistance, survival, and celebration even under difficult circumstances and used it to found my coaching practice. I help mothers who are academics find meaning in their experiences, make connections to others, and take positive steps towards shaping their futures. I’m looking forward to bringing to you my experiences as a grad student mom, job searching with a toddler, being the only person in my department to have a child, being pregnant of the tenure track, gaining tenure, and having a long distance marriage for several years. Although it feels weird as a feminist to say this, I’m proud of my 22 year long partnership with my now husband Neil who has seen me through master’s degrees, my PhD, getting tenure, and creating an equitable marriage. I would love to have a hobby; Michele has inspired me to find my knitting needles which are still packed from our move.

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Graduate Students, Parenthood, and the R1 Fishbowl

I just finished reading Kate Bahn’s post “When Grad School Eats Up Your Good Years” at Chronicle Vitae about the opportunity costs of being a mother and an academic. Bahn is a graduate student at the New School, and comes to the conclusion that combining motherhood and a career as an academic is simply too hard. Since she wants to have children she writes that she isn’t going to pursue an academic career. Bahn sees few role models in her field of economics and astutely notes the many institutionalized forms of discrimination that mothers experience. While I’m always glad to see younger scholars writing about motherhood and intellectual life, I came away from this essay incredibly frustrated.

As you all know, I’m all about working to name and change structures of discrimination within the academy. But Bahn’s post mostly made me angry for two reasons. First, Bahn repeats intensive mothering ideologies that it is just too hard to be a mother and do intellectual work. Decades of foundational mothering studies scholars, including Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Andrea O’Reilly, Sara Ruddick, Patricia Hill Collins, Fiona Green, Pegeen Reichert Powell, Sara Blaffer Hrdy, Elizabeth Podnieks and many many others have shown us that not only is it possible to think and mother, but that our scholarship is enhanced through our experience as mothers. Special shoutout to Elizabeth Podniek. Her edited collection Mediating Moms: Mothers in Popular Culture, to which I contributed an essay, was awarded the Outstanding Scholarship Prize (2012-2013) by the Women’s and Gender Studies Association, part of Canada’s Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Or as I call it, a fork in the eye of the idea that you can’t produce significant scholarship and have children.

Bahn’s essay highlights the importance for graduate students of not getting trapped in the feedback loop of senior professors at your R1. Faculty who came of age in a different time are not, in my opinion, the best people to talk to about the realties of the job market and choices available to faculty today.  First of all, at the at the conference I just attended I talked many women who have successfully combined motherhood and academic careers. And guess what? We have tenure and we’re on hiring committees. Second, the majority of jobs are not at elite research universities. Asking a professor who has spent their life within the peculiar strictures of an R1 for family planning advice is misguided. What I wish is that graduate students like Bahn might get out of the R1 fishbowl and talk to the majority of faculty members teaching at community colleges, regional state universities, and community colleges. We might have a different story to tell about intellectual labor and mothering.