MITACoach FAQ and Workshop Schedule

Why did you start offering these workshops? Mothering in the Academy (MITA) came out of my desire to find a support and community as a graduate student mom, having a second child on the tenure track, and then mentoring junior faculty parents after I got tenure. I noticed that the connections I made at conferences were vital to my success, although I couldn’t predict if I would meet other mother scholars at a particular conference. I received encouragement and support that really differed from that of friends in grad school or in my academic position, because we were able to offer each other outside perspectives on institutional problems. I even edited a book with Pegeen Reichert Powell after meeting her on a panel!

I decided to create my blog, open a coaching practice, and hold workshops in order to provide academic moms with consistent resources and a community outside of their current departments, much like I sporadically found at conferences.

I firmly believe that we need peer-mentors as role models to succeed.

The workshops especially are structured around the idea that mother scholars need a community to talk about their experiences and needs where they don’t need to have their “game faces” on. The workshops are deliberately kept small and framed as cohorts, with the hope that you’ll learn just as much from the participants as from me and the other seminar leaders. Each workshop will have a private Facebook group so that participants can keep in touch with each other.

MITACoach workshops will happen three times a year at critical moments to help mother scholars bridge work and family. Mid-summer to plan for the academic year, mid-fall to take stock of your work-life balance and plan for winter break, and mid-spring to plan for a productive and restful summer.

What happens in the workshop? In keeping with the busy schedules of academic moms, the workshop is designed for flexibility. You get a 30 minute flash strategy Skype or phone call with me, to be scheduled at your convenience during the month of July.

During the week of July 14th, there will be four conference call seminars on different topics. Each speaker will talk for about 20 minutes, and the rest of the seminar will be devoted to workshop participants’ questions. Don’t worry if you can’t make a specific call. All of the seminars will be available as mp3 files for you to review when you have time.

 

Jocelyn Stitt U of Michigan

Tuesday July 15th

2-3pm EST

Alison Piepmeier

College of Charleston

Wednesday July 16th

2-3pm EST

Michele Dunnum Mott Community College

Thursday July 17th

2-3pm EST

Laura Harrison

Minnesota State U

Friday July 18th

2-3pm EST

Academic Moms: How To Get What You Need from One of the Least Family Friendly Professions Professional Decision Making: A Single Mother and Department Chair’s Rubric to Avoid Superwoman Syndrome How I Survived and Thrived with a 4-4, Long Commute, Single Parenthood, & Remarriage Parenting Through Academic Career Transitions: Finding a Career While Keeping Your Sanity 

Finally, you’ll get a workbook designed to allow you to take action on what you’ve learned during the week and in your consultation with me.

You can find detailed information about the workshop and seminar leader bios here: https://mitacoach.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/mitacoach-mid-summer-workshop-starting-july-14/

 How do I enroll and what is the deadline? What happens next? You can enroll by clicking on the paypal button on mitacoach.wordpress.com website. The fee is 69$. Special Grad Student/Adjunct Rate $49. Or you can email me at mitacoach @gmail.com to send me a check. The deadline for the summer workshop is Sunday July 13th. After you enroll I’ll be in touch with a few questions so I can tailor the workshop to you, set up your flash consulting appointment, and send you your workbook. You’ll also get instructions in how to participate in the conference call and an invitation to the private Facebook group.

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MITACoach Mid-Summer Workshop Starting July 14

JOIN THE SUMMER 2014 COHORT

Mid-Summer Workshop Week of July 14

• Are you feeling overwhelmed?
• Do you feel the summer slipping away and you’re not writing?
• Would you like to be able to relax during family time and feel focused while you’re working?
• Want to prepare yourself and your family for the upcoming academic year?

Would you like to be part of a small cohort dedicated to finding solutions to these issues? 

Mothers working in the academy often find themselves torn in multiple directions with competing claims from family, teaching, research, service, and self-care. This workshop, run by Jocelyn Stitt, an academic mother devoted to helping other academic mothers, provides tested frameworks for rejuvenating, reflecting, and transforming the way we think about work by mother scholars at a variety of institutional locations.

Jocelyn’s coaching practice, MITACoach, is currently having a special of 3 coaching sessions with goal assessment toolkit and enrollment in the workshop for $199. OR, try out the coaching service by enrolling in the workshop for $69.

and receiving a free 30 minute session with Jocelyn. MITACoach is a coaching practice and blog dedicated to helping academics who are mothers find coaching, community, and support for their professional and personal goals. The summer cohort will be limited to 20 participants. EACH PARTICIPANT RECEIVES:

30 minute flash strategy call with MITACoach Jocelyn Stitt

Summer 2014 MITACoach workbook including

Concrete tips for using the summer to rejuvenate after a long academic year

10 key questions to help you reflect on your past work and family experiences

Writing prompts to identify and evaluate what your goals are for a successful blend of family and work

Curated transformative short readings that have the power to change how you think about work and parenting

Action Steps to help you reprioritize for the coming academic year

Four Conference Call Seminars over the course of the workshop addressing specific challenges facing academic mothers. Our fabulous SEMINAR LEADERS were chosen for their different institutional locations, their areas of expertise in education and mothering, their diverse identities and family structures, and their ability to overcome specific challenges. Each seminar will be recorded and available as an mp3 file for participants.

Email Jocelyn at mitacoach @ gmail.com with any questions. To sign up, please click on the Paypal Donate button on the right sidebar.

Seminar Leader Bios:

MICHELE DUNNUM lives in Ann Arbor and is a Professor of English and Coordinator of the Developmental Writing Program at Mott Community College in Flint.  Ten years ago, I began my tenure-track job four months before my divorce was final and had to adjust to the demands of full-time work and a one-hour commute as I navigated the emotional difficulties of sharing custody of my preschooler.  My son is now fourteen, beginning high school in the Fall, and I have been married to another Mott English professor for two years.  My husband brought two young-adult stepsons into my life, so I have learned a few things about the peculiar role of the stepmother and the art of family blending (gently—more like stirring than blending).  I could say that parenting, marriage, teaching a 4-4 load, and holding a leadership position at my college is a juggling act, but I lack the gross mental motor skills that are necessary for that kind of juggling.  I become an anxious insomniac if I try.  Instead, I pick up one ball at a time.  And I knit—as of four months ago, for the first time in a thousand years, I have an actual hobby(!)

LAURA HARRISON is an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at Minnesota State University – Mankato. I research the ways in which reproductive technologies intersect with ideologies of race, family formation, and reproductive justice. My current book project is titled Brown Bodies, White Babies: The Politics of Crossracial Gestational Surrogacy (under contract with NYU Press). I have a two and a half year old daughter named Ada and am due with my second child in August. I was on the job market while I was pregnant, finished my dissertation and accepted a job offer while my daughter was a newborn, and am facing book manuscript deadlines and pre-tenure job expectations while pregnant again! I look forward to discussing strategies and tactics that have worked for me in facing these challenges as a mother and an academic.

ALISON PIEPMEIRis director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and associate professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the College of Charleston (SC). I’ve written books including Girl Zines: Making Media, Doing Feminism (NYU Press, 2009), and I’m currently at work on another book, The Good Mother:  Down Syndrome and Reproductive Decision-Making (under contract with NYU Press).  I’m mother to Maybelle, who’s almost six and has Down syndrome. Since 2013 I’ve been a single parent. This means, among other things, that I’m trying to figure out how my budget can work. I have seizures and for the past three years have been unable to drive, although that recently changed [hurray!].

JOCELYN STITT I’ve spent the last year taking a leave from my academic position, moving to a new state, enrolling my kids school, joining a research institute at the University of Michigan, and starting MITACoach. When I’m not transporting kids and pets across state lines, I’m an Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at Minnesota State University where my research focuses on the amazing cultural productions of Caribbean women, especially their autobiographies. I’ve taken my research on how women tell stories of resistance, survival, and celebration even under difficult circumstances and used it to found my coaching practice. I help mothers who are academics find meaning in their experiences, make connections to others, and take positive steps towards shaping their futures. I’m looking forward to bringing to you my experiences as a grad student mom, job searching with a toddler, being the only person in my department to have a child, being pregnant of the tenure track, gaining tenure, and having a long distance marriage for several years. Although it feels weird as a feminist to say this, I’m proud of my 22 year long partnership with my now husband Neil who has seen me through master’s degrees, my PhD, getting tenure, and creating an equitable marriage. I would love to have a hobby; Michele has inspired me to find my knitting needles which are still packed from our move.

MITACoach.wordpress.com

 

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Thursday Thought – Tips for Transitioning into Summer

Thursday Thought - Tips for Transitioning into Summer

In parenting lingo, “transition” refers to times when we ask our kids to switch gears from one activity to the next, like ending a playdate so that you can go home. Transitions for my kids often meant tantrums. “No leave the park!” my two year old would scream, alerting everyone to my wonderful parenting skills.

We’re also making some big transitions in the academic year. So if you’re feeling tantrumy (that should be a word), you’re not alone. Just at the point when many of us are most tired, we’re asked to recalibrate our routine. Some of us are making the transition from teaching to focusing more in our research, administrative tasks, or syllabi redesign during the summer. Others are ending winter term classes and gearing up for their spring/summer teaching. If you have kids, especially those too old for daycare, the transition from school to camps or at home child care is just around the corner, which can be trying for everyone.

In the coming weeks I’ll be talking more about strategies for a peaceful transition to the summer months. For now, here are three tips for managing this transitional time. Rejuvenate, Reprioritize, and Reflect will be central themes of our June Workshop aimed at helping you make the most of your summer and early fall.

1) Rejuvenate
If you’re like me, you might have a bunch of stuff, both personal and professional, that you’ve put on the back burner until the semester is over. My best advice is that these things can take wait a bit longer. If you can, try to take at least a day where you’re not being goal oriented to let your brain relax. It’s even better if you can put aside a couple of days to restart a gentle exercise program if that has gone by the wayside, get a massage, or spend time with friends. Binge tv watch. Nap. If this seems indulgent, it’s not. You’ve been working hard and you need a break. Full stop.

2) Reflect

If you do have fewer teaching responsibilities, this can be a good time to reflect on what has gone well in the past year, and what hasn’t with your teaching and research. I like to keep a single Word document where I list ideas for future classes and what I wouldn’t do again. I also sometimes use the reviewing function of word to mark up my syllabi with notes about reordering texts, or revising assignments.

3) Reprioritize
Once your brain is rested, think about August 30th. What would you need to have accomplished by then for you to feel good about your summer? What experiences do you want to have with your family? What work would you need to do in the next 10-12 weeks? Most importantly, what can you realistically do during this time period so you don’t end up mad at yourself? For example, drafting a journal article and teaching one class is probably realistic if you have a lot of child care. If you want to spend more time with your kids this summer, then adjust your productivity goals accordingly.